The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai

Trajal Harrell’s sort-of West Coast Premiere,“The Ghost of Montpellier Meets the Samurai,” never really happens according to its choreographer. In fact, it started premiering in 2015 and “still won’t be ready for today’s performance,” announces Harrell from a front row  ...

The Realistic Joneses, SF

There is a lot of depth to be found in banality. Especially if you dig under the dialogue of a Will Eno play. A master wordsmith, Eno keeps things simple, accessible and really funny, while hinting at the big questions  ...

“The Soul’s Messenger”

For the final concert of the 21st Other Minds Festival, Meredith Monk Vocal Ensemble delivered a bare bones retrospective of a handful of Monk’s abundant and mesmerizing repertoire. It’s an oxymoron to say that this life long minimalist presented  ...

Macbeth, Berkeley

“Bubble bubble, toil and trouble” and for what? An evening of “sound and fury,” signifying, if not nothing, precious little. Expectation ran high for Berkeley Rep’s visually stunning, starry production of Shakespeare’s Scottish play. Helmed by the great American  ...

The Flick

  Annie Baker’s Pulitzer-winning script for "The Flick," newly opened at Steppenwolf Theatre, gives us a chance to get to know three people, underpaid workers in a movie theater in Worcester County, Massachusetts. Their story of the minimum-wage economy  ...

2666

The Goodman Theatre’s new production of “2666," adapted from the massive novel by the late Roberto Bolaño, takes five stories and threads them loosely together with a couple of mysteries that keep us wondering until the end. And the end  ...

Dirty Dancing

“Nobody puts baby in a corner!” the iconic line from “Dirty Dancing,” may have earned itself a place as the universal cry for women’s rights. That the show’s working class protagonist, Johnny Castle, speaks the line, poses no problem. On  ...

Little Erik

"Little Eyolf," one of Henrik Ibsen’s lesser plays, has been updated and up-ended by writer and director Mark Jackson in the Aurora Theatre’s world premiere production of "Little Erik." In re-writing Ibsen’s 1894 plot into a superficially contemporary story about  ...

Aubergine, Berkeley

Can a bowl of soup really save a life? Probably not, but it makes for some interesting speculation in Julia Cho’s “Aubergine,” a play about love and death, estrangement and reconciliation, immigration and assimilation and, most of all, food, developed  ...