San Francisco Ballet – The Sleeping Beauty

Fairy tales can come true; it can happen to you …especially if you’re in the audience at San Francisco Ballet’s lavish production of The Sleeping Beauty. First presented in St. Petersburg in 1890, this collaboration between Pytor Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, the composer, and Marius Petipa, the great choreographer, was  ...

San Francisco Ballet – 2000 Season, Program 4

If all ballet programs were as varied, exciting and superbly performed as the fourth in San Francisco Ballet’s current season, ballet might be as popular as football. Not that this troupe can complain about being based in a city that supports a full season of dance that runs  ...

San Francisco Ballet

Sometimes a ballet program is like a sandwich, with the filling stuck between two slices of white fluffy stuff. So it is with San Francisco Ballet’s Program 2. It’s not that Antony Tudor’s Gala Performance and Stanton Welch’s Taiko are bad ballets. They are fun, in their different ways,  ...

San Francisco Ballet – Nutcracker

"Nutcracker" Nation: How an Old World Ballet Became a Christmas Tradition in the New World (2003), Jennifer Fisher Tis the season -- the season for Santa and Scrooge and those ubiquitous dancing nutcrackers. And, of all the “Nutcrackers” in the Bay Area, stretching from Oakland to  ...

San Francisco Ballet – Giselle

Cosmic Form of Dancing Shiva Water Color on Tussar Silk from Exotic India Before there was Swan Lake or Sleeping Beauty there was Giselle. The durable old dame has been showing up in theaters across the world, danced  ...

San Francisco Ballet – Tuning Game, Celts, Without Words

The San Francisco Ballet's third program of the season brought the company premiere of Nacho Duato's Without Words set to an arrangement of Schubert songs (minus the voice) for cello and piano. First created in 1998 for American Ballet Theater, the ballet is sculptural, stark, strikingly moving and beautiful  ...

San Francisco Ballet Program 5: culturevulture.net – review

San Francisco Ballet offered something for the funny bone and something for the heart in its fourth program offering of the 2009 season. First the heart. Antony Tudor’s 1936 masterpiece “Jardin aux Lilas” (“Lilac Garden”) stepped out on the San Francisco stage for the first time, a belated but welcome  ...