Disgraced

Chicago,

Disgraced

Photo caption: L to R, White, Sturgis, Young, Crane. Photo by Liz Lauren. “Disgraced” won a 2013 Pulitzer Prize for playwright Ayad Akhtar. But that doesn’t mean you won’t be squirming in your seat in mental discomfort as the ...

The Tempest, Chicago Shakespeare Theater

  Chicago Shakespeare’s bewitching new production of “The Tempest” was adapted and directed by Aaron Posner and Teller (the silent member of the Penn & Teller duo). The play has all of its poetry and more music and magic ...

Things You Shouldn’t Say Past Midnight

Three couples, three bedrooms and a conference call. That’s the scenario. It’s two hours of pillow talk (and pillow shouting) among people who are trying to get their needs and desires met, but keep running into complications. “Things You Shouldn’t ...

Stupid Fucking Bird

Early in Anton Chekhov’s “The Seagull,” Konstantin, the tortured artist playwright, laments the need for new expression in theater: “… to my mind, the modern theater is nothing but tradition and conventionality.” I mused about that speech during Sideshow Theatre’s ...

Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash

“Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash,” now extended through August at the Mercury Theatre on Southport, deserves to be called a jukebox musical. It’s a rousing evening of Johnny Cash’s music—some 30 songs by Cash and other songwriters—performed ...

E. Faye Butler, actor, Chicago

Faye Butler describes herself as an actor who sings, not a singer who acts. She’s a theater and musical star in Chicago and nationally and has won many awards and honors for her work. She currently plays the cleaning lady, ...

The Who and the What

    What distinguishes contemporary faith from the traditional? It's often the ability to ask questions, to explore how meanings have changed, while still maintaining respect for its beliefs. That's the question explored in Victory Gardens Theater's new ...

Moby Dick, Chicago

  Lookingglass Theatre’s new production of “Moby Dick” gives a modern infusion of energy and fluidity to Herman Melville’s 19th century whaling tale. The sprawling 700-page novel is smartly encapsulated into a two-and-three-quarter hour play without losing any of ...