John Constable: The Making of a Master, London

My favorite anecdote about the painter John Constable (1776-1837) concerns the hare that can be seen running across the foreground of his large watercolor "Stonehenge" (1835), one of the highlights of this new show at the Victoria and Albert Museum.  ...

Late Turner — Painting Set Free, London

Come the end of this year, London will have hosted three major exhibitions focusing on the late works of three highly significant artists — Rembrandt, Matisse and Turner — offering audiences and critics the opportunity to appreciate and reflect on  ...

Ed Paschke Art Center, Chicago

  The work of a Chicago artist who won national and international fame is settled in at a small museum on the far northwest side of Chicago, the neighborhood where he grew up. Ed Paschke, whose vividly colored and brilliantly  ...

Imperial War Museum, London

London’s Imperial War Museum (IWM London) has reopened after a £40 million ($68 million) refurbishment, its first since the 1980s. The result is a sleek, lofty interior designed by Foster & Partners housing a spacious and attractive museum that invites  ...

Making Color, London

Ultramarine is a blue pigment derived from a semi-precious stone, lapis lazuli. During the Renaissance period, lapis lazuli was more highly prized than gold, and with good reason: its only source was in the remote province of Badhakhshan in northeast  ...

Chicago Architecture:

  Chicago is known for its iconic classic and contemporary architecture, as well as for its famous and eccentric architects, such as Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Perhaps because of that environment, many Chicagoans are  ...

Building the Picture, London

"Building the Picture" is about the bit of an Italian Renaissance painting that often seems to be jostling with the figures for pictorial space: the architectural background. In fact, as curators Amanda Lillie and Caroline Campbell convincingly demonstrate, buildings played  ...

Matisse Cut-Outs, London and New York

Old age is no respecter of genius. True, there have been some artists — Goya, for example, or Monet — who managed one final great surge of creativity, but the sad fact is that far more end up plagiarizing themselves,  ...